Elczar Adame's Shared Points on SharePoint

Archive for January, 2008

Installing MOSS 2007 in Windows Server 2008 RC1


 

Installing MOSS 2007 in Windows Server 2008 RC1

I have mentioned in my previous blog that SharePoint bit is no longer available in Windows Server 2008 RC1. However, since Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 is the unsurpassed solution for collaboration, portal, search, content management, business form, business intelligence, and portal management, it is levelheaded to explore it in Windows Server 2008, including:

1.      Support for Windows Server 2008

2.      Support for Internet Information Services 7.0

3.      Support for AJAX web part.

4.      Support for new operations and properties for stsadmin tool.

5.       Other hotfixes provided by MOSS 2007 SP1.

Installing MOSS 2007 in Windows Server 2008 requires an installer “with” both WSS 3.0 SP1 and MOSS 2007 SP1 slipstream. With the help of a friend, Maria Green, a Regional IT Pro Evangelist for Microsoft Asia Pacific, I was able to create an installer – since it is not yet available, at least as far as I know.

How to create? This is what I will be sharing with you, with an assumption that you are running in a 32-bit machine.

1.      Copy your MOSS 2007 installer to C:\MOSS directory. It includes setup file, autorun file, x64 folder, and x86 folder.

2.      Download WSS 3.0 SP1 and MOSS 2007 SP1 to C:\SP1 directory to have the wssv3sp1-kb936988-x86-fullfile-en-us.exe and officeserver2007sp1-kb936984-x86-fullfile-en-us.exe executable files.

3.      Extract WSS 3.0 SP1 to C:\MOSS\x86\Updates folder by executing C:\SP1\wssv3sp1-kb936988-x86-fullfile-en-us.exe /extract: C:\MOSS\x86\Updates.

4.      Extract MOSS 2007 SP1 to C:\MOSS\x86\Updates folder by executing C:\SP1\ officeserver2007sp1-kb936984-x86-fullfile-en-us.exe /extract: C:\MOSS\x86\Updates.

As briefly as that, we could now install MOSS 2007 in Windows Server 2008 RC1 and start walking around it! For a detailed guide, you could check this out from Ben Curry’s blog.

IIS 7.0 Shared Configuration


 

IIS 7.0 Shared Configuration

 

While I was preparing some demonstrations on Internet Information Services 7.0 for a technical event, I was challenged on how to present IIS 7.0 Shared Configuration feature using my local machine alone. Since I have only a 1G of RAM, I could not create a virtual machine where I could host the shared configuration file. After few glasses of water, I finally came out of a means. And the same technical presentation approach I will be adopting in this piece to guide you in the implementation of this IIS 7.0 configuration system feature.

 

In my previous piece, I have discussed the general features of IIS 7.0 configuration system, including configuration levels, organization of settings, applicationHost section groups, configuration schema, and other configuration files. On top of that, I have partly mentioned that the same configuration file could be shared across several Web servers in load balancing or farm, it is where IIS 7.0 shared configuration feature is made for.

 

Export Configuration

1.      The first step towards sharing an IIS 7.0 configuration file is to export it to UNC share in a File Server, but in my case, for demonstration purposes, I will simply export it to other location in my machine. To do this, let us open our Internet Information Manager, and then double-click Shared Configuration, as illustrated below. The Shared Configuration window will be displayed. It is illustrated correspondingly below.

 

SharedConfigurationModule

 

SharedConfiguration

 

2.      In the Action pane of our Shared Configuration window, let us click Export Configuration. As illustrated below, the Export Configuration dialog box will be displayed.

 

ExportConfiguration

 

3.      In the same dialog box, let us name the UNC share location where we are going to house our shared configuration. Then again, I have simply pointed it to other local folder for our purpose. Moreover, we need to define a corresponding Encryption Key Password. Then, click OK and we will have shared configuration files. Let us open the location we have defined to verify that applicationHost.config, administration.config, and configEncKey.key files are present.

 

Enable Shared Configuration

1.      The second step is to enable the IIS 7.0 Shared Configuration feature. In our Shared Configuration window, as illustrated below, let us check the Enable Shared Configuration checkbox, specify the physical path of our shared configuration files, supply corresponding credential, and then click Apply in the Action pane. We will be challenged to supply the Encryption Key Password we have previously defined.

 

EnableSharedConfiguration

 

2.      Upon supplying a valid Encryption Key Password, we will be prompted by a message box telling us that our existing IIS encryption keys will be backed up in the current configuration directory on our local machine. To effect enabling of shared configuration, let us restart our IIS (run > cmd > iisreset /noforce), then let us close and open our IIS Manager. And that’s it! Our IIS 7.0 is already pointed to our shared configuration file.

 

Disable Shared Configuration

1.      An optional step is to disable the IIS 7.0 Shared Configuration. In our Shared Configuration window, let us uncheck the Enable Shared Configuration checkbox, and then click Apply in the Action pane.

 

2.      Upon clicking Apply, we will be prompted by a message box asking us whether to continue using shared configuration files and encryption key or not. This will overwrite our local configuration file at %windir%\system32\inetsvr\config by the shared configuration file. Else, the local configuration file will be used having its previous state.

 

3.      To effect disabling of shared configuration, let us restart our IIS (run > cmd > iisreset /noforce), then let us close and open our IIS Manager. And that’s it! Our IIS 7.0 is already pointed to our shared configuration file.

 

Staging Shared Configuration

As I mentioned earlier, because of limited resources, I am forced to create a demonstration of this feature locally. NOTE: If you have appropriate resources, it should be demonstrated with File Server and Web Servers (load balancing) in a domain.

 

1.      Export your configuration files through Export Configuration facility of IIS 7.0.

2.      Enable the IIS 7.0 Shared Configuration feature.

3.      Now that we are already pointed to our shared configuration files, create a Web site.

4.      Disable IIS 7.0 shared Configuration feature. Upon being asked to continue using the shared configuration files and encryption key, choose NO to retain the previous state of our local (default) configuration files. And you will notice that the Web site we have previously created (under our shared configuration files) is not reflected as we are pointed to our local (default) configuration files.

5.      It partly demonstrates that Internet Information Services 7.0 is exactly using the defined configuration files. It may be shared locally or in a network.

IIS 7.0 Diagnostic Features


 

IIS 7.0 Diagnostic Features

How about reading this piece first before posting your Internet Information Services concerns in the forum? You might resolve it by your own! I may start with a joggle of words: “undefined problem is a problem”. It is simply to say that, understanding the problem is more than basic to have the right solution.

Most of our Web server quandaries are grounded on an undetermined nature and cause of the problem. Every so often, we immediately dive into a conclusion without granting the occurrence an opportunity to be diagnosed. Gathering server problem information is challenging, but not it the case of Internet Information Services 7.0 that is endowed by easy-to-use diagnostic features, including Error Pages, and Failed Request Tracing. Besides, by simply disabling the “Show friendly HTTP error messages” setting in the Tools > Internet Options > Advanced tab of our Internet Explorer would provide us fundamental information in solving the setback.

This paper will provide us a guide on how to utilize both the Error Pages, and Failed Request Tracing of Internet Information Services 7.0.

Error Pages

1.       Let us open our Internet Information Services Manager. Start > Administrative Tools > Internet Information Services Manager.

2.       Under the IIS Area of a specific Web site, as illustrated below, double-click Error Pages Module.

 

 ErrorPages

 

3.       At the right panel of our Error Pages window, under the Actions section, let us click the Edit Feature Settings. As illustrated below, an Edit Error Pages dialogue box will be opened.

ErrorDialogue

4.       In the Edit Error Pages dialogue box, under the Error Responses section, let us select the Detailed Errors option. Not to mention that we could create our own custom error pages and set our Error Responses to Custom Error Pages. Otherwise, we could set it to Detailed Errors for local requests and Custom Error Pages for remote requests.

5.       Now, to shoot an HTTP Error 404.0, let us try to browse a non-existing page. An illustrated error page will be displayed. It contains Error Summary, Detailed Error Information, Most Likely Causes, Things You Can Try, and Links and More Information sections.

ErrorSummary

Failed Request Tracing

1.       Let us open our Internet Information Services Manager. Start > Administrative Tools > Internet Information Services Manager.

2.       Under the IIS Area of a specific Web site, double-click Failed Request Tracing Module. As illustrated below, the Failed Request Tracing Rules window will be displayed.

 

TracingRules

3.       First, we will enable the failed request tracing. To do this, at the right panel of our Failed Request Tracing Rules window, under the Actions section, let us click Edit Site Tracing. A dialogue box will appear. As illustrated below, we will check the Enable checkbox then, let us click OK.

TracingEnable

4.       Now we will add failed request tracing rule. At the right panel of our Failed Request Tracing Rules window, under the Actions section, let us click Add. As illustrated below, we will be prompted by wizard.

TracingWizard

5.       Under the Specify Content to Trace window of the wizard, we will select All Contents (*) option. Then, let us click Next.

6.       In the Define Trace Condition window, let us check the Status Code(s) checkbox, and write 404 in the corresponding textbox. Then, click let us Next. It obviously means that we will only be tracing HTTP 404 error in this demonstration.

7.       For our purpose, we will leave all Providers being checked and being verbose as their Verbosity property in the Select Trace Providers window. Then, we will click Finish. And we are done.

8.       Now, we will produce an HTTP 404 error by browsing  a non-existing directory from our web site. Then, let us open C:\inetpub\logs\FailedReqLogFiles\W3SVC4\ directory and we will have our failed request tracing log. Double-click the corresponding XML document and we will have the page that presents the Request Summary, Request Details, and Compact View. Below is the illustration.

 TracingSummary

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